Bringing History to Life for your Kids

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Instilling a Love of History

For years, I have heard people say how much they disliked history growing up. “It was my least favorite subject in school.” This is a very popular opinion. When learning is a series of memorizing dates and names then I agree, it is boring. History is losing its hold in the mainstream classroom. It will be cut out in years to come. There is a way to create a love of this subject for your children. Maybe, you’ll learn to love it again too.

Bringing History to Life

Throughout the world, history is inches from modern life. It is everywhere. Most of the planet courses and pulses through immense amounts of ancient history that a lot of people do not know is there. For example, throughout Greece and Italy, every time a new subway line is dug another archaeology site is uncovered. This is not typically an issue in the United States due to its incredibly young history in terms of the wrinkle of time, but the history is still there. No matter what your topic of interest, there is something to see and explore in close proximity to you.

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If the Civil War is your American History preference then the East Coast is covered in fascinating, patriotism inspiring locations to explore that are FREE. From reenactments to open battlefields and everything in between. The possibilities are endless for your children to learn. The subject matter that these places evoke is vast. From slavery and Civil Rights to architecture and medical treatment. You and your family can, in theory, learn everything you’ve ever wanted to know in regards to life and war during the 17th century; all sparked by a few stops in the Eastern United States.

The Midwest has its own claims to fame in regards to the Civil War, but what you will find the most of is beautifully preserved Native American history. California is full of Missions, Gold Rush, Wild West, and the list goes on and on. Every single U.S. states offer something wonderful if you’re willing to seek it out.

Where do you Start?

This is probably the question that I get asked the most; along with “how do you find these place?” The process is rather simple. Google. I kid you not, we live in a day in age where I can google “Historical Landmarks along route 66” and I will get a plethora of results. Not every stop is mind-blowing, but with enough early research, they can be. For example, when we were PCS-ing from Camp Pendleton to New River, NC I searched for “things to do off of route 66 (insert state).” That led us to Meteor Crater, which was amazing! It also gave us endless amounts of things to do in the states that I thought would be “long and boring” to drive through.

In that particular 47 hour trip, I remember being leery about driving through Western Texas and New Mexico. Hot long hours in the car, but with some research, we were able to make stops like Cadillac Graveyard in Western Texas, which sparked great conversations about art as a creative movement and art history.

Letting the History Guide Your Travels

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There are many times while traveling that I have visited destinations ONLY to see a piece of history that I cannot see anywhere else. Even people who don’t particularly care about history do this. Rome, for example, is a destination entirely based on seeing history. Nobody visits Rome for the cultural exchange. It is too touristy for that. People go to Rome to see the buildings and places where world-changing history took place.

The above photo is a small portion of a building complex on the Eastern coast of the island of Crete in Greece. I had no other reason to visit that area. EVERYTHING else I wanted to see was hours away on the Western side. I had waited my whole adult life to stand on the grounds of this particular building. My kids were unimpressed and that was fine with me. There were pieces of it that they loved like the peacocks walking around freely, which led to a long conversation about peacocks and symbolism for royalty. History brought to life, literally, in a bird. This conversation turned the entire outing around for my kids. Suddenly, other aspects of the complex began making more sense.

Learning to Let Go of the Learned Outcome

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Deciding to make time for living history adventures is the hardest part. Switching from an “I’m too tired to care about that” lifestyle to a “Let’s go see what it’s all about” lifestyle is difficult. It will not always be exciting. It will not always provoke insightful conversations. Not everything you try to achieve presents as a win when first executed. Teaching your children to love history through going out and seeing it, being a living part of the history of that place, will, however, teach them a deep appreciation for history. Appreciation is where it all begins. Get out there.

 

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Author: thewildbradburys

A mother to three boys and military spouse. I LOVE all things outdoors, travel and natural living inspired. My background is in archaeology/museum curation, but I'm also a certified birth and postpartum doula as well as placenta encapsulationist. I am always trying to build the tribe and encourage people to live to their fullest potential. The blog is primarily dedicated to traveling and exploring with kids and living a life of adventure.

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